Mom Must-Haves

Life hack: Non-Slip Toddler Booties

My 13 month old toddlers will NOT keep socks on. They pull them off by the toes of the socks and just giggle. It’s been so cold here and I hate them having bare toes, especially on our tiled kitchen floor. 


I bought some booties off of Amazon…. because I buy everything on Amazon. At the time that I purchased them the description said they had a non-slip sole. But the striped version that I bought didn’t have the non-slip bottoms. I complained in a review and they’ve since changed the description. I considered sending them back but they’re just too stinking cute. I came across a “life hack” option to use fabric paint on the bottom of toddler socks to add a non-slip texture. A lightbulb went off… the adorable booties can be saved!!! 

I had some 3D fabric paint on hand that I used for our Christmas stockings, so I thought I’d give it a whirl. The fabric paint cake from Hobby Lobby and I paid $1.29 for 1 fl. oz.  

Mission Motherhood

What we’ve learned: our first year with twins

Today in our Facebook memories, I found a list of things that my husband and I learned in our first week as parents.  We felt totally clueless in that first week, still learning what cries mean… the trial and error or satisfying a fussy baby.  We’ve learned a lot in that one week and we learned so much more in the weeks to come.  Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.00.56 AM

Here is what we have learned in year one:

  • Becoming a Stay-at-Home-Mom was the best thing we could do for our marriage and our children. I don’t say this to discredit working moms. Working moms are the strongest women I know. I’m just not good at it… the pressure I put on myself at work and at home was just too much for me to deal with and still be productive in each of my roles as a supervisor, parent, and wife. My husband tells me I’m my worst critic and he may be right about that.
  • Getting out of the house can be therapeutic.  (Therapeutic in the way that sometimes a deep tissue massage can feel painful, but you always feel great a few hours later and it carries on into the next few days) Life with twins is hard.  Getting out to do the simplest things is so much more complicated when you have to get 2 babies out.  But getting out of the house and learning to navigate life in my new normal was therapeutic.  Was it easier to stay home… definitely… but it’s great to feel human and make a trip to Target.
  • People say the most ridiculous things to twin parents. My most favorite was from a young waitress at dinner the other night, “Have you thought about what you’re going to do for their senior pictures? There are so many cute things you’ll be able to do.” Uhhh…. we have about 17 years to think about it and we probably won’t make them do senior pictures together because they are indeed individuals.  (See my past blog for more ridiculousness)
  • Don’t expect all of those people who offered to help to show up.  I would say about 25% of those that offered to help were there to help.  So many family members came out of the woodwork when they found out we were pregnant with twins… but a small handful have been present.  I’m totally happy with this because the handful that are present are such significant people in our lives and will continue to be in the lives of our children.
  • Making 3 months of freezer meals was the best thing I did to prep for the babies. It was so nice to not have to pull dinner together or run to the grocery store to buy something to throw together.
  • Communication is important, but it may not be as important as sleep.  Our first six months of being parents was so challenging.  Neither one of us knew what we were doing and both of us were so prideful that when the other made recommendations of things to try we would typically just snap.  How dare you make a suggestion and insinuate that I don’t know what I’m doing!!! We are both perfectionists so hearing that we weren’t doing something right was difficult.  We stopped being so touchy when we started getting more sleep.
  • Pumping is hard.  I was an exclusive pumper and I wish I would’ve offered my babies breast milk for their first year of life.  I stopped pumping at 8 months. By the time they were mobile, it was more difficult to pump and I would have to get up 2-3 times during a 20 min pump session to get one baby off the other or keep them from getting into something. I felt like a brand new woman when I finished pumping and I felt like I gained so much more valuable time with my babes.
  • Unsolicited parenting advice will come at you from all angles. Be kind and take it with a grain of salt. You know what is best for your children and your family.
  • Month 0-3 is the absolute hardest. Things get easier in the 6th month and a whole lot more fun in the 8th month.  And for us, the sleeping through the night was a game changer at 10 months.
  • People are generous. So many people gave us baby things in the last year.  Friends that I haven’t seen since college messaged and asked if we needed clothes or baby items.  It was amazing.  We really didn’t have to buy hardly any clothes.
  • Buying second hand is the best! Babies use things for such short periods of time it seems so silly to spend the money on new items. But as a stay-at-home-mom, budgeting is important. We utilized a number of consignment sales in our area like Rhea Lana, Just Between Friends and Savers.
  • Prayer is an absolute necessity for me. Bringing some peace into what feels like a chaotic life is much needed. Praying did that for me.  When I would wake up anxious about why the kids didn’t get up for a bottle… and when I couldn’t go back to sleep because the kids would be up soon for a bottle anyway… I prayed. Prayed for my healthy babies, for peace, for restful sleep, for my husband, for milk production, and so many other things.
  • We can still do more than I ever thought we could.  I said this after our first week and I say it now… but now I say it to include the babes too.  They are little rock stars. Their pediatrician tells us that she never would’ve guess they were premature because they are excelling in so many ways. They do things daily that impress me. As a family we still do things that surprise some.

In all that I’ve learned in the last year, it is incredibly difficult to deal with the urge for more babies.  Looking back and reminiscing on what our last year has been like makes me want to experience it all over again.  But I guess I’ll wait for the emotions to pass before we try to make that decision just yet.

Mission Motherhood

Twin Delivery: My Birth Story

On this day last year, our twins were born.  Today has me reminiscing, so I thought I’d tell my birth story.  It’s a long story, so bear with me. Hopefully it can help ease the minds of soon-to-be twin mommas.

On November 9, 2016 I was on my way to work and I was feeling a bit fuzzy, light headed and I was seeing bright lights in my periphery.  I thought it was food related and my body was mad at me for not eating enough breakfast.  When I got to work I ate something and told my boss I needed to run to the nearest CVS to check my blood pressure.  My blood pressure was 159 / 96 and it continued to get worse in the 10 min that I sat there and checked it 4 times.  I called my OB’s office and they asked me to have someone drive me to Labor and Delivery (although I stubbornly drove myself).  After arriving at Labor and Delivery at 9:00am, it seemed like they were just going to keep me overnight for observation like they did 3 weeks prior.  However, by 3:00pm I began having contractions (that I wasn’t feeling) and I was dilated to 5 cm and 90% effaced.  I was at 32 weeks and 3 days.  My husband rushed to the hospital from work and by the time he arrived they started me on steroid shots for the babies and magnesium sulfate to stop my labor.  They told me I would be getting the “mag” for 48 hours, long enough to complete the steroid shots to help give the babies’ lungs a fighting chance.  I wasn’t allowed to eat until signs of labor subsided, and I was forced to use a bed pan because they didn’t want me getting out of bed on the magnesium sulfate. It was that or a catheter and I chose bed pan. By 8 pm that night, the head of the NICU and one of the NICU nurses came to our room to talk to us about what it would look like to have babies in the 32nd week of pregnancy.  We were terrified to say the least.  They informed us that they had a room for them in the NICU prepared, just in case. They told us to expect to be in the hospital until our due date, Jan 1, which would be nearly 2 months. My OB said that my body could go back into labor as soon as the 48 hours of “mag” was completed.  So we prayed…

Despite huge fluctuation in my blood pressure and a couple hours of the day where contractions were happening every 10-15 min, we made it another day…. and then another day after that…  My OB said we wouldn’t be leaving the hospital without babies, but he wouldn’t let me go longer than 37 weeks and if we made it that far we would induce at 37 weeks.  They rolled a long term bed into my room, which may have been the most comfortable bed I’ve ever slept in, and began my wait.  I was in good spirits and thankful and grateful that I was able to rest up and keep the babies in.  I was taking everything one day at a time and keeping myself occupied.  I took two naps a day, spent a few hours a day working on my laptop, reading, working through puzzle books, watching movies and Netflix, and eating… A LOT.  On the 18th day (November 26) I began getting cabin fever.  I needed to move, stretch, wear real clothes, get out of the room and hallway I had been confined to for 18 days.  I was given permission to take a wheel chair ride outside and to the cafeteria, and I got approval to take a bath in the hospital jacuzzi tub which is generally reserved for post postpartum mommas.  We ate dinner in my room and we tried to watch a movie.  It was a good day and I had convinced myself that this is the best it’s going to get and every other day from here on out will just be blah.  I just began falling apart… sobbing… “how do they expect me to do this for 14 more days?!”  At some point in the middle of my breakdown, my nurse Stacy came in.  This God-send of a woman gave me a big hug and a bit more faith. She gave me a pep talk and convinced me that 35 weeks was a huge accomplishment.  We decided rather than focusing on how many days we had been there, we were going to focus on how many days we had remaining until we got to meet our babies (the 37 week mark).

My husband and I finished our movie and went to bed.  I woke up around 1:00am and had a hard time going back to sleep… so I watched the baby monitors for a while and got up to use the restroom.  I suspected my water broke, or maybe one of the babies had pinched off my bladder causing what felt like breaking waters. I decided to eat graham crackers and a cliff bar, just in case.  I climbed back into bed and felt like I was still leaking so I called Stacy.  She was so excited for me. She turned on the lights and checked to confirm it was amniotic fluid. My husband woke up from his tiny little bed and says… “what’s going on? what time is it?”.  Stacy says, “We’re checking to see if her water broke.”  He yells, “Why didn’t you wake me up?” I didn’t want to wake him up until I knew for sure it was amniotic fluid. After Stacy confirmed my bag of waters broke, she brought in a handmade gift from the night nurses and techs.  They had made me a paper chain for the next 14 days filled with encouraging words and I was to break off a paper link with each day.  She hands it to me and says, “I guess you won’t need this anymore”.  She called the on call OB and he told her to keep a close eye on me and page him if I got closer. My husband began frantically packing our room up anticipating delivery at any moment, and Stacy gave him a hard time for it because she knew we’d have plenty of time to pack. Stacy left at 7am shift change and I was so sad to see her go, but my nurse Christy tagged in to take over and she was phenomenal too.

By 9:00am my contractions had subsided and zero progress was being made.  My OB said that most twin deliveries require pitocin because a woman can deliver twin A and her body can stop laboring which can put twin B in danger, so they give pitocin to keep labor progressing.  Since I was going to have to get on the pitocin later in delivery, he said we could go ahead and start it now and try small amounts of it to keep things moving forward.  We gave it a try and nothing. I remember watching Golden Girls and listening to the Hillsong United – Empires album. They slowly increased my pitocin and by 1:00pm I was ready for an epidural.  The epidural stick was way more painful than ANY of the contractions I had up to that point. The first one he blew out so he had to stick me again.  I was leaning over Christy and squeezing her harder than I thought I ever could and glad I didn’t cause her permanent damage.  The epidural felt great for about 45 min…. and then I could feel everything on one side. At one point I sat up in bed through such a pain that I couldn’t even suck in breath. My husband called the nurse and I told her to get that “effer” back in there to fix it.  So for the 3rd time, he placed an epidural and finally I felt great.  I took about an hour and a half nap and when I woke up I was at 9 cm.  Within an hour I had progressed to a 10 and we were ready to start pushing.  So they got my husband dressed and wheeled us down to the Operating Room, leaving my mom behind in the L&D room. As they wheeled me in, the strongest sense of determination came over me. I was calm, and more focused than I have ever been in my life. They transferred me to the most uncomfortable bed in the warmest room in the hospital. There had to be 15 people in there… 3 nurses for me, OR techs, a couple nurses and respiratory therapist for each baby. It was a packed house.

I was so in-tuned with my body and so focused. My OB said we would push at the start of each contraction for the count of 10.  I could tell him when they were coming before the monitors could, which surprised him. He cheered me on and coached me through it and he was fantastic. I have never felt so empowered.  I pushed for about 40 – 45 min before twin A was delivered. And my husband shouted “She’s so big!” because he had envisioned such a tiny baby. She was quiet… and I was scared. They said she was likely stunned from being in the birth canal for so long. My husband kept peeking across the room to get a visual on her and within a few minutes she was crying.  I couldn’t see because as soon as she was delivered I had two nurses on my belly to prevent twin B from rotating.  It took one push for him and he came out wailing. My husband walked over to where he was laying and twin B grabbed daddy’s hand.  They were both breathing great so they brought them to my chest… first twin B, then twin A. I looked up at my husband and said “this is the coolest thing ever!”

They walked us back to our room where my mom was anxiously waiting.  They informed us that it wasn’t likely that the babies would need any NICU time, and we were in awe. God had answered SO many prayers… and every single day confined to that room was WORTH IT.